loyalty

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If we admit it, regardless of how much we dislike our jobs, there is a certain loyalty inherit in working for a company. When talking with colleagues you may complain about things, rant about injustices and stupidity you see, but when talking to people outside the company you gloss over the problems. We all do it.

The true test of any company is how it handles it’s employees when things go wrong. I’ve only faced such a situation twice with my current company, both times involving a sudden death in the family (is there honestly any other type?). In both cases I’ve asked for as small an amount of time off as I could possibly manage, and in both cases it’s been a problem! The words may be consilatory and full of the caring,sharing words that people use in such situations, but the initial reaction has been “No”.

To be fair to the copmpany, in both situations after some negotiation I have managed to arrive at a solution that was acceptable, but the question is why should I have to negotiate? In 10 years I’ve amde 2 requests for time off for compassionate grounds – a total of 7 days. In the last 5 years I’ve not had a single instance of sickness. That record isn’t unusual – far from it – but surely it should count for something?

The inherant loyalty that exists only stretches so far.